Book Review: Zen in the Art of Writing

#SciFi #BookReview #RayBradbury – Thanks, Writer Jean Frost Smith

Ink Wrangler

zenLet me start by saying that I am a huge fan of Ray Bradbury’s writing. Something about his writing speaks to my inner being. It makes my soul dance, my heart ache, and my eyes leak rivulets of tears.

This book is a fascinating tale of his life and times, his troubles and the process he went through in becoming a writer. No – he was always a writer, it’s the process of becoming a paid writer.

This is not a ‘how-to’ book. There are some real gems of advice, for instance – write down nouns and ideas. Keep them for inspiration. Pick one if you’re stuck and write about it.

The part that resonated most strongly with me, however, was the revelation of ‘the child within’. Ray never lost his childhood sense of wonder – and yes, even fear. The tennis shoes have not lost their magic, the carnival is…

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December’s Random Repartee

#SciFi #IndieAuthor #Update #Biography December 14th, 2017, is my feature day on the 22 Days of Christmas, and I thought I'd provide a blog post as my shareable content. First, a little about me that I've not listed on my various profiles. Hitherto Unknown Factoids I was born in Vancouver, British Columbia. Canada, in 1967, … Continue reading December’s Random Repartee

Lessons Learned from Agatha Christie: The Omission Says It All.

#BlogShare #WriterTips #Plot #AgathaChristie #Poitot

Jean Lee's World

Studying Agatha Christie’s Poirot mysteries has been a real treat this year. But like any favorite food, its taste has grown a touch stale on my writing pallette. Before I take a good, long break from one of the greatest authors of all time, I wanted to share one of the lessons learned from what many consider to be her masterpiece: And Then There Were None

And-Then-There-Were-None-HBI had written this book because it was so difficult to do that the idea had fascinated me. That people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer being obvious. I wrote the book after a tremendous amount of planning, and I was pleased with what I had made of it. It was clear, straightforward, baffling, and yet had an epilogue in order to explain it. It was well received and reviewed, but the person who was really pleased with it…

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